Anzac Day

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Remembering in gratitude and humility

“This year we are encouraged to find other ways of demonstrating our commitment to Anzac Day commemorations. Some communities have suggested standing on our driveways at dawn service and parade times, thus lining the streets of our suburbs in an alternative way, whilst others will undoubtedly use social media to broadcast their personal commemorations,” says Navy Chaplain Fr Stephen Briggs

Dr Cooper and Miss Bedford 'on call' in their horse and buggy on George Street in 1895 (Courtesy of John Oxley Library, State Library of Queensland)
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Miss Bedford and Dr Cooper – pioneering Queenslanders and St Mary’s parishioners

Dr John Earwaker from St Mary’s, Kangaroo Point tells us about Dr Cooper and Miss Bedford, two pioneering locals and devout St Mary’s parishioners who were decorated for their courageous service in World War I and whose unique legacies live on today

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Remembrance Day

This year on Remembrance Day and Defence Sunday, we remember our Defence Force Chaplains and the important pastoral care work they do with our military personnel and veterans

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Canon Garland: ‘the architect’ of Anzac Day

The Rev’d Canon David Garland has long been regarded as ‘the architect’ of Anzac Day, and is a revered figure in the history of the Anglican Diocese of Brisbane. In this video, the Anglican Church Southern Queensland honours Canon Garland and explains why he is identified with the national day of remembrance that is Anzac Day. Lest we forget.

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The first casualty of war…

The Anglican Dean of Brisbane explores World War I poetry in this thought-provoking Anzac Day reflection: “As the war went on, the poetry became more earthy, visceral and complex. This was driven by one aim, the desire for truth-telling. And for that truth-telling to reveal the reality that the authors felt was masked by the nationalistic and sentimentalist poetry.”