FCAC students win places in prestigious music program

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Nine Fraser Coast Anglican College students have gained positions in the State Honours Ensemble Program (SHEP) Capricornia, presented by the Queensland Conservatorium – Griffith University

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Nine Fraser Coast Anglican College students have gained positions in the State Honours Ensemble Program (SHEP) Capricornia, presented by the Queensland Conservatorium – Griffith University, in Rockhampton.

Year 10 student and viola player Kaitlin Edmondstone said that she is especially looking forward to playing diverse genres of music and collaborating with other viola students from other schools.

“I am very much looking forward to playing the different types of music, including classical, jazz and popular, with a full-size orchestra and string group that the SHEP is able to offer,” Miss Edmondstone said.

“As the only viola player at school, I am also looking forward to working with other students who play the same instrument as I do.”

The students will attend the two-and-a-half-day intensive program, along with some of Queensland’s finest young musicians.

Students are nominated by their teachers, and undergo a rigorous selection process based on academic achievement and their Australian Music Examination results.

College Principal Joe Wright said that he was proud of the achievements of the nine students and the efforts they put into the selection process.

“It is tremendous to see such a large number of our students accepted into this esteemed program,” said Mr Wright.

“These students have worked extremely hard with their teachers, and it is wonderful to see their commitment and passion being rewarded in this way.”

During the workshops, the students will have the opportunity to work alongside conductors from the Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University in a variety of ensembles and orchestras, culminating with a concert performance on the final day.

Mr Wright said that the SHEP is valuable in the way it develops the students’ skills and is an important historical tradition of the College.

“Our College community is very excited about the wonderful opportunity this presents for our students and to see them further develop as talented musicians, and we are all looking forward to hearing all about their experiences when they return,” he said.

“FCAC has a long history with the SHEP, with many of our students being accepted in the past, and it is pleasing to see these students continuing that tradition.”

Miss Edmondstone and trumpet player Andries du Plooy said that playing music is important for their well-being and the formation of their identity.

“Playing a musical instrument allows me to express myself, my personality and my emotions through music – in other words it allows me to express my individuality,” Miss Edmondstone said.

“Playing the trumpet is important for my mental well-being and community work and development,” Mr du Plooy said.

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