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Meet a saint for our times – Evelyn Underhill

“In a time when the Church was very much a male-dominated institution (and eager to remain so) one can only imagine what it meant to women in the earlier half of the 20th century to have a spiritual guide like Evelyn,” says Cathedral parishioner Delroy Oberg on Evelyn Underhill, who is marked in our Lectionary on 15 June

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Three Anglican priests, 10 siblings, a dog named ‘Satan’ and hundreds of letters

“Picture, if you will, a large extended family on holiday in Porlock, Somerset, in the south west of England. The date is August 1906 and the family have taken rooms at Birchanger Farm for a month where they have been enjoying excursions, bicycling, walking and bathing,” writes Frances Thompson following her discovery that the famous Bodleian Library holds hundreds of her family’s letters, dating back to the early 1900s

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Raisin' the curtain on the not-so-humble hot cross bun

“While the spiced bun’s popularity has been on the rise since medieval times, discussions about its origins quickly peel off into a hotly contested debate,” says anglican focus Editor Michelle McDonald, who asks, “How do you HCB?” and “Can you please send us your favourite recipe?”

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Anselm of Canterbury

“Anselm of Canterbury was the most significant Christian theologian between Augustine of Hippo and Thomas Aquinas and is regarded as the founder of scholastic theology,” says The Rev’d Canon Dr Marian Free on St Anselm of Canterbury whose Feast Day is marked on 21 April