anglican focus

The news site of the Anglican Church Southern Queensland: nourishing and connecting our faith community

Traditional Owners

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Traditional Custodians: educators

“I am often asked to yarn with young school students – facilitating yarning is an important role of a First Nations educator…Everything I know is from yarning, listening and learning from my family and Elders,” says Aunty Sandra King OAM

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Traditional Owners: leaders

“One of the things that I do remember from my childhood and schooling was that there was no separation of the non-Indigenous and First Nations students at school. What that meant is that I was used to being a leader and spokesperson for all the school students,” says priest and Wakka Wakka man The Rev’d Canon Bruce Boase

Lalania Tusa with her 13-year-old son Tama and a burnie bean pod: "My family have always openly shared the practices and knowledge of Aboriginal culture with others" (Lalania Tusa)
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Traditional Owners: knowledge keepers

“My people’s knowledge is not taught through sitting in a classroom, researching on Google or going to a university to study, as it is the type of knowledge that can only be taught and passed down through hours upon hours of walking, sitting, speaking and most importantly listening to Elders, family members, community and spirit,” says Kuku Yalanji Traditional Owner Lalania Tusa in the new anglican focus series, ‘What is a Traditional Owner?’