anglican focus

The news site of the Anglican Church Southern Queensland: nourishing and connecting our faith community

Wontulp-Bi-Buya College

Books & Guides Books & Guides

Where Do We Go From Here?

The Rev’d Canon Dr Jim McPherson reviews ABM’s Lenten resource, Where Do We Go From Here? Missional Bible Studies Based on the Book of Acts: “These are not the sort of Bible studies where texts are marshalled and compared to other texts to merely enhance Bible knowledge…The study aims to help us take Scripture so seriously that it deeply confronts our own discipleship”

News News

Wontulp-Bi-Buya College, Cairns

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Christians from different denominations and Nations tell us why they are studying and working in the wonderful ministry that is Wontulp-Bi-Buya: “We don’t only learn about God, we learn about being brothers and sisters and that feeling of love that you feel within this college is so beautiful…The teachers understand us. They know our needs and they understand us.”

Ranjani, St Francis College student Loretta Tyler-Moss, The Rev’d Victor Joseph (Principal, Wontulp-Bi-Buya College), The Rev’d Andrew Schmidt (with baby John), The Rev’d Samuel Dow (with Ellie), The Rev’d Jasmine Dow (with Amelie), St Francis College student Glynn Holland-Leam, Peter Branjerdporn and Louise Schmidt on the ABM pilgrimage to Wontulp-Bi-Buya College in Cairns in mid-June
Features

Exploring mission in a post-colonial Australian church

As part of our series on Reconciliation Action Plan achievements, recent Wontulp-Bi-Buya College pilgrims tell us about their immersion trip to Cairns, including the highlights of the pilgrimage

Reflections

Pilgrimage to Wontulp-Bi-Buya (WBB) College

As part of our anglican focus series on Reconciliation Action Plan implementation, The Rev’d Jazz Dow reflects on how St Francis College is strengthening relationship with Wontulp-Bi-Buya (WBB) College in Cairns, including the rich benefits of St Francis College students making a pilgrimage to WBB and experiencing what Torres Strait Islanders call ‘Good Pasin’