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The news site of the Anglican Church Southern Queensland: nourishing and connecting our faith community

National Reconciliation Week

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Coalition of Peaks calls for braver and more impactful action

“A reconciled nation is where Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples have full control over our own destinies; where we live freely and equally, unencumbered by trauma and poor life outcomes; and where there is true recognition of our rights as First Peoples of this land; and, where our cultures and languages are honoured, protected and flourish,” says the Coalition of Peaks, a representative body of over 50 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community-controlled peak organisations

Anglicare Cultural Support Worker Lalania Tusa setting up art and cultural activities for children to enjoy and learn with in August 2020
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More than a word: Reconciliation takes action

“Through the Reconciliation process, I believe that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children will have the same life chances and choices as non-Indigenous children, and the length and quality of First Nations peoples’ lives will not be determined by their racial background,” says Anglicare Cultural Support Worker and Kuku Yalanji Traditional Owner Lalania Tusa, as National Reconciliation Week continues

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A Reconciliation message from Archbishop Phillip Aspinall

“Reconciliation begins with truth telling. Then it must involve taking action to set right situations where there is inequality, systemic racism or abuse of human rights…Peace and Reconciliation are central to the mission of the Anglican Church Southern Queensland. Strengthening and healing relationships with our First Nations peoples are fundamental to that mission,” says Archbishop Phillip Aspinall

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Making Reconciliation a reality for First Nations children in care

As National Reconciliation Week approaches, with this year’s theme being ‘More than a word. Reconciliation takes action’, Anglicare Cultural Support Officer and Pitta Pitta man Noel Doyle shares how non-Indigenous foster carers can help make Reconciliation a reality for First Nations children who are disproportionately represented in out-of-home care

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Black Lives Matter!

“Systemic racism operates at the deepest levels of our society. Systemic racism, or institutional racism, by another name, refers to how ‘white superiority’ functions as the norm. It is the lens by which we see all things. It shapes the political system, police force, the educational system, legal system, employment practices, and, yes, even our Church,” says Gurindji man and National Aboriginal Bishop Chris McLeod