anglican focus

The news site of the Anglican Church Southern Queensland: nourishing and connecting our faith community

Domestic and family violence

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QCT webinar: what is domestic and family violence?

This webinar will explore the topic of ‘what is domestic and family violence’ and will include personal stories. This session is part of a series of Domestic Violence Awareness webinars organised by the Joint Churches Domestic Violence Prevention Project, a commission of Queensland Churches Together (QCT). See more.

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QCT webinar: responding to domestic family violence

This webinar will explore the topic of ‘understanding perpetrators’ and ‘how to respond to domestic and family violence’. This session is part of a series of Domestic Violence Awareness webinars organised by the Joint Churches Domestic Violence Prevention Project, a commission of Queensland Churches Together (QCT). See more.

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Joint Churches Domestic Violence Prevention Project: updated resource

“The Church is in a unique position of being able to offer practical, emotional and spiritual help to all who are impacted by DFV, from initial contact right through to the ongoing emotional and spiritual support often required long term by victims and reforming perpetrators, when the need for more specialised and emergency assistance has either passed or run its course,” says Chair of JCDVPP Felicity Bailey

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From living on Christchurch’s streets to helping those living on Toowoomba’s

“My own experience being homeless, hungry and cold for six months in my mid-teens has helped me to empathise with those doing it tough on the streets…We opened our Winter Shelter in the parish hall in early June to provide a safe haven at night for people sleeping rough,” says The Rev’d Pauline Harley from the Parish of Toowoomba West, as Homelessness Week approaches in the first week of August

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National Anglican Family Violence Research Report released

The Standing Committee of the Anglican Church of Australia has made 10 Commitments to prevent and respond to Intimate Partner Violence (IPV), after undertaking the first known Australian Church study into the prevalence of IPV within its faith community

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A story of emotional, financial and spiritual abuse within a headship marriage

“I share my story with you in the hope that in the not-too-distant future, we as a Christian community can better assist those who are living the silent nightmare I was – to give them access to knowledge and permission to seek assistance, as well as encouragement and support,” says a courageous parishioner, as part of the anglican focus domestic and family violence series of stories and features

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Are we pretending that all is well?

“The difficulty with this approach is that it asks victims and survivors of domestic and family violence and abuse to pay the price for the rest of us to feel ok. They are often expected, tacitly or otherwise, to continue to bear the shame and embarrassment of a less-than-Christian family life so that we can continue to believe that Christians don’t do that sort of thing,” says The Rev’d Gillian Moses while reflecting on the expectation of victims and survivors to remain silent, as Domestic and Family Violence Prevention Month approaches in May

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Sieving or straining?

“One recent challenging incident had a quick and positive outcome, as I employed nonviolent communication as a helpful tool to resolve a matter and build relationship with relatively new neighbours…I find that the nonviolent communication principles and process help me to put what I am thinking or about to say through a sieve,” says St Andrew’s, South Brisbane parishioner Liz Wellauer

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From biscuits to Bishop

The Rev’d Kate Ross tells us about trailblazing ordination of women campaigner, mother of six, nurse and midwife, childbirth educator and social justice advocate, Gwenneth Roberts, and about an exhibition she and Gwenneth are opening in the Cathedral to honour the women of our Diocese historically

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Whose side are we on?

“One of my close friends recently opened up about the extent of the violence she experienced in her marriage. Raised in a Christian home, she married a Christian man whom she said, “looked perfect on paper”. They are both intelligent people at the top of their professional fields, and had a lovely home with beautiful children at the best private schools. I knew that there were problems, but it was not until a year after they separated that I discovered the extent of what she had endured,” says The Rev’d Ann Edwards

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With children more vulnerable to violence than ever, WCC moderator reflects on the vital role of churches

In an ongoing call to churches across the globe to work together to prevent gender-based violence, particularly against women, children and young people, World Council of Churches moderator Dr Agnes Abuom reflects on some of the reasons such violence has increased, and the vital role churches can play in creating safe spaces for those most at risk